Androgenic alopecia or male pattern baldness (MPB)

MPB is responsible for the vast majority of hair loss in men. While there are many possible reasons people lose their hair, including serious disease, reaction to certain medications, and in rare cases extremely stressful events, most hair loss in men can be blamed on heredity.

What male pattern baldness sufferers are actually inheriting are hair follicles with a genetic sensitivity to Dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is a derivative or by-product of testosterone. Testosterone converts to DHT with the aid of the enzyme Type II 5-alpha-reductace, which is held in the hair follicle’s oil glands.  Hair follicles that are sensitive to DHT begin to miniaturize, shortening the lifespan of each hair follicle affected. Eventually, these affected follicles stop producing cosmetically acceptable hair.

Male pattern baldness is generally characterized with the onset of a receding hairline and thinning crown. Hair in these areas including the temples and mid-anterior scalp appear to be the most sensitive to DHT. This pattern eventually progresses into more apparent baldness throughout the entire top of the scalp, leaving only a rim or “horseshoe” pattern of hair remaining in the more advanced stages of MPB. For some men even this remaining rim of hair can be affected by DHT.

 

Drug induced hair loss

Many commonly prescribed prescription drugs can cause temporary hair loss, trigger the onset of male and female pattern baldness, and even cause permanent hair loss. Note that the drugs listed here do not include those used in chemotherapy and radiation for cancer treatment. your doctor may not mention hair loss as a side effect of some drugs, so don’t forget to do your own research and read the drug manufacturer’s complete warnings. Your pharmacist can provide you with this information even before you fill a prescription.

 

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy hair loss may occur on the scalp, face, underarms, and other places on the body.  It is the most common side effect of chemotherapy treatment.

Why hair loss? In the case of chemotherapy, hair loss occurs because some anticancer drugs are made to kill fast-growing cancer cells. However, certain normal cells, like hair cells, are also fast growing; chemotherapy affects these cells, too. For almost everyone, hair begins to grow back several months after chemotherapy ends. While the hair may initially be of a different texture and even a somewhat different color than your original hair, this difference is usually temporary.